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Prepare and Protect

Emergency Items You SHOULD Hoard

Nelson Espeland III

Tuesday, February 11, 2014 • 2:24pm

If you’ve ever watched Extreme Couponing on TLC, it takes less than 2 minutes to realize that most of these people have hoarding issues. How many bottles of Suave shampoo does one family need in the lifetime? There are cases upon cases of “bargains” these people feel like they’ve “won." I find myself sitting there and wondering if they would ever need this much of shampoo or bird seed even if the apocalypse was next week? It’s doubtful.

Let’s say some dire emergency is coming, which the forecast is calling for Wednesday night into Thursday morning (almost 12 inches)--what would we truly need to hoard to survive?

My family and I own a home out in the country. We do know how to survive off the land and we spend our weekends and summers living this way and modeling it for our children. How to survive on your own, in the wilderness, with just you and a few tools your parents taught you how to use. That’s how we roll.

SO that part of survival is about skill, and we’re set in that area. But what would we need, aside from certain skills, to survive in a case of emergency.  We can boil it down to FOUR simple things: water, fuel, batteries, and flashlights. No, shampoo did not make the list.

Water

The most basic of the basics, clean water becomes more precious than gold when it’s unavailable. And it’s so much more than just drinking it. You’ll need stored water for not only drinking, but cooking, sanitation, bathing, and, at some point, laundry.

Store plain tap water in cleaned out 2-liter soda bottles and stock up on cases of bottled water. If space allows, larger water containers can be stored outdoors.

You also want at least two ways to purify water. Unscented bleach is a good option: it takes just eight drops of bleach to purify a gallon of water, 16 drops if the water is cloudy. But be forewarned: bleach has a shelf life of just one year, and begins to lose potency after just a few months. Buy a new bottle every six months and begin using the old one for laundry and cleaning purposes.

Another easy way to purify water is to boil it, but this requires a fuel source. Plan ahead if you choose this option. A third easy alternative is the SteriPen, which uses UV light to purify water, a system that has long been used in hospitals.

Fuel

After Hurricane Sandy, you know how first-hand how precious fuel is during an emergency. Trying to get your hands on it was like trying to get your hands on the Holy Grail. We were lucky enough to have generators, but fuel was getting scarce and everyone was trying to get their hands on some. To prevent that from happening again, be prepared.

According to the American Petroleum Institute, gasoline can be safely housed in approved containers of less than five gallons each and rotated through every few months. Make sure to rotate the stock, by putting the oldest gas into the car, and refilling the gas can at the service station, adding fuel stabilizer each time.  If you only need to have 12 gallons on hand, get three 5 gallon cans (15 gallons total), and once a month put one into your car, and then refill it, putting it at the back of the row. Next month, put the next one in, etc.   If you "rob" your supply to fill the lawn mower, that's fine, too, just make sure you keep minimums on hand.

Gasoline should be stored in capacities of 25 gallons or less, should be stored at room temperature. Make sure it is away from sources of heat and ignition. Also make sure to store the gasoline in a building separate from the house or place of occupancy. Diesel fuel is an even safer option when it comes to storage. If you have a propane-powered grill, good news: Propane is one of the easiest and safest fuels to store. A supply of seasoned wood is also a necessity if your emergency plans include the use of a fireplace, wood-burning stove or cooking over a campfire.

Light Sources

Light sources come in all kinds of shape and sizes. You have flashlights, lanterns, candles, glow sticks etc., we tend to have them all on hand in strategic places. I have flashlights next to all the beds. We also have a light kit stored in the kitchen, a central location that is high enough and away from the kids, but easy enough for us to just grab on a moment’s notice. Make sure all flashlights have working batteries and that there are back up batteries in your kit. So hoard light sources AND batteries.

Canned Food

The kind of foods our parents hoarded back in the day is quite different from the foods we’d hoard today. We’ve come a long way in many ways, we are much more nutritionally conscious, but then again, we have many more chemicals and toxins that they didn’t have. It gets tricky figuring this out. There’s a great blog that lists what you’d need assuming we’re all First Time Shopping for Emergency Foods. Click here and read the list and all about what foods you want to hoard (or just stock up on) and why.

 

The forecast is calling for 12 inches Wednesday night. That means many of us will be snowed in with our kids and pets as well. Don’t forget to pack an emergency FUN kit to keep the kids busy, and to stock up on extra pet supplies. Also if someone in your family takes medications, make sure you have them as the likeliness you will be out of the house on Thursday is slim to none. Be safe, and be smart. Remember top prepare and protect, we must act proactively! Be safe friends and feel free to call me, Nelson, with any questions at 908.233.6300!

If you’ve ever watched Extreme Couponing on TLC, it takes less than 2 minutes to realize that most of these people have hoarding issues. How many bottles of Suave shampoo does one family need in the lifetime? There are cases upon cases of “bargains” these people feel like they’ve “won”. I find myself sitting there and wondering if they would ever need this much of shampoo or bird seed even if the apocalypse was next week? It’s doubtful. Hmmm.

Let’s say some dire emergency is coming, which the forecast is calling for Wednesday night into Thursday morning (almost 12 inches)--what would we truly need to hoard to survive?

My family and I own a home out in the country. We do know how to survive off the land and we spend our weekends and summers living this way and modeling it for our children. How to survive on your own, in the wilderness, with just you and a few tools your parents taught you how to use. That’s how we roll.

SO that part of survival is about skill, and we’re set in that area. But what would we need, aside from certain skills, to survive in a case of emergency.  We can boil it down to FOUR simple things: water, fuel, batteries, and flashlights. No, shampoo did not make the list.

Water

The most basic of the basics, clean water becomes more precious than gold when it’s unavailable. And it’s so much more than just drinking it. You’ll need stored water for not only drinking, but cooking, sanitation, bathing, and, at some point, laundry.

Store plain tap water in cleaned out 2-liter soda bottles and stock up on cases of bottled water. If space allows, larger water containers can be stored outdoors.

You also want at least two ways to purify water. Unscented bleach is a good option: it takes just eight drops of bleach to purify a gallon of water, 16 drops if the water is cloudy. But be forewarned: bleach has a shelf life of just one year, and begins to lose potency after just a few months. Buy a new bottle every six months and begin using the old one for laundry and cleaning purposes.

Another easy way to purify water is to boil it, but this requires a fuel source. Plan ahead if you choose this option. A third easy alternative is the SteriPen, which uses UV light to purify water, a system that has long been used in hospitals.

Fuel

After Hurricane Sandy, you know how first-hand how precious fuel is during an emergency. Trying to get your hands on it was like trying to get your hands on the Holy Grail. We were lucky enough to have generators, but fuel was getting scarce and everyone was trying to get their hands on some. To prevent that from happening again, be prepared.

According to the American Petroleum Institute, gasoline can be safely housed in approved containers of less than five gallons each and rotated through every few months. Make sure to rotate the stock, by putting the oldest gas into the car, and refilling the gas can at the service station, adding fuel stabilizer each time.  If you only need to have 12 gallons on hand, get three 5 gallon cans (15 gallons total), and once a month put one into your car, and then refill it, putting it at the back of the row. Next month, put the next one in, etc.   If you "rob" your supply to fill the lawn mower, that's fine, too, just make sure you keep minimums on hand.

Gasoline should be stored in capacities of 25 gallons or less, should be stored at room temperature. Make sure it is away from sources of heat and ignition. Also make sure to store the gasoline in a building separate from the house or place of occupancy. Diesel fuel is an even safer option when it comes to storage. If you have a propane-powered grill, good news: Propane is one of the easiest and safest fuels to store. A supply of seasoned wood is also a necessity if your emergency plans include the use of a fireplace, wood-burning stove or cooking over a campfire.

Light Sources

Light sources come in all kinds of shape and sizes. You have flashlights, lanterns, candles, glow sticks etc., we tend to have them all on hand in strategic places. I have flashlights next to all the beds. We also have a light kit stored in the kitchen, a central location that is high enough and away from the kids, but easy enough for us to just grab on a moment’s notice. Make sure all flashlights have working batteries and that there are back up batteries in your kit. So hoard light sources AND batteries.

Canned Food

The kind of foods our parents hoarded back in the day is quite different from the foods we’d hoard today. We’ve come a long way in many ways, we are much more nutritionally conscious, but then again, we have many more chemicals and toxins that they didn’t have. It gets tricky figuring this out. There’s a great blog that lists what you’d need assuming we’re all First Time Shopping for Emergency Foods. Click here and read the list and all about what foods you want to hoard (or just stock up on) and why.

 

The forecast is calling for 12 inches Wednesday night. That means many of us will be snowed in with our kids and pets as well. Don’t forget to pack an emergency FUN kit to keep the kids busy, and to stock up on extra pet supplies. Also if someone in your family takes medications, make sure you have them as the likeliness you will be out of the house on Thursday is slim to none. Be safe, and be smart. Remember top prepare and protect, we must act proactively! Be safe friends and feel free to call me, Nelson, with any questions at 908.233.6300!

If you’ve ever watched Extreme Couponing on TLC, it takes less than 2 minutes to realize that most of these people have hoarding issues. How many bottles of Suave shampoo does one family need in the lifetime? There are cases upon cases of “bargains” these people feel like they’ve “won”. I find myself sitting there and wondering if they would ever need this much of shampoo or bird seed even if the apocalypse was next week? It’s doubtful. Hmmm.

Let’s say some dire emergency is coming, which the forecast is calling for Wednesday night into Thursday morning (almost 12 inches)--what would we truly need to hoard to survive?

My family and I own a home out in the country. We do know how to survive off the land and we spend our weekends and summers living this way and modeling it for our children. How to survive on your own, in the wilderness, with just you and a few tools your parents taught you how to use. That’s how we roll.

SO that part of survival is about skill, and we’re set in that area. But what would we need, aside from certain skills, to survive in a case of emergency.  We can boil it down to FOUR simple things: water, fuel, batteries, and flashlights. No, shampoo did not make the list.

Water

The most basic of the basics, clean water becomes more precious than gold when it’s unavailable. And it’s so much more than just drinking it. You’ll need stored water for not only drinking, but cooking, sanitation, bathing, and, at some point, laundry.

Store plain tap water in cleaned out 2-liter soda bottles and stock up on cases of bottled water. If space allows, larger water containers can be stored outdoors.

You also want at least two ways to purify water. Unscented bleach is a good option: it takes just eight drops of bleach to purify a gallon of water, 16 drops if the water is cloudy. But be forewarned: bleach has a shelf life of just one year, and begins to lose potency after just a few months. Buy a new bottle every six months and begin using the old one for laundry and cleaning purposes.

Another easy way to purify water is to boil it, but this requires a fuel source. Plan ahead if you choose this option. A third easy alternative is the SteriPen, which uses UV light to purify water, a system that has long been used in hospitals.

Fuel

After Hurricane Sandy, you know how first-hand how precious fuel is during an emergency. Trying to get your hands on it was like trying to get your hands on the Holy Grail. We were lucky enough to have generators, but fuel was getting scarce and everyone was trying to get their hands on some. To prevent that from happening again, be prepared.

According to the American Petroleum Institute, gasoline can be safely housed in approved containers of less than five gallons each and rotated through every few months. Make sure to rotate the stock, by putting the oldest gas into the car, and refilling the gas can at the service station, adding fuel stabilizer each time.  If you only need to have 12 gallons on hand, get three 5 gallon cans (15 gallons total), and once a month put one into your car, and then refill it, putting it at the back of the row. Next month, put the next one in, etc.   If you "rob" your supply to fill the lawn mower, that's fine, too, just make sure you keep minimums on hand.

Gasoline should be stored in capacities of 25 gallons or less, should be stored at room temperature. Make sure it is away from sources of heat and ignition. Also make sure to store the gasoline in a building separate from the house or place of occupancy. Diesel fuel is an even safer option when it comes to storage. If you have a propane-powered grill, good news: Propane is one of the easiest and safest fuels to store. A supply of seasoned wood is also a necessity if your emergency plans include the use of a fireplace, wood-burning stove or cooking over a campfire.

Light Sources

Light sources come in all kinds of shape and sizes. You have flashlights, lanterns, candles, glow sticks etc., we tend to have them all on hand in strategic places. I have flashlights next to all the beds. We also have a light kit stored in the kitchen, a central location that is high enough and away from the kids, but easy enough for us to just grab on a moment’s notice. Make sure all flashlights have working batteries and that there are back up batteries in your kit. So hoard light sources AND batteries.

Canned Food

The kind of foods our parents hoarded back in the day is quite different from the foods we’d hoard today. We’ve come a long way in many ways, we are much more nutritionally conscious, but then again, we have many more chemicals and toxins that they didn’t have. It gets tricky figuring this out. There’s a great blog that lists what you’d need assuming we’re all First Time Shopping for Emergency Foods. Click here and read the list and all about what foods you want to hoard (or just stock up on) and why.

 

The forecast is calling for 12 inches Wednesday night. That means many of us will be snowed in with our kids and pets as well. Don’t forget to pack an emergency FUN kit to keep the kids busy, and to stock up on extra pet supplies. Also if someone in your family takes medications, make sure you have them as the likeliness you will be out of the house on Thursday is slim to none. Be safe, and be smart. Remember top prepare and protect, we must act proactively! Be safe friends and feel free to call me, Nelson, with any questions at 908.233.6300!

If you’ve ever watched Extreme Couponing on TLC, it takes less than 2 minutes to realize that most of these people have hoarding issues. How many bottles of Suave shampoo does one family need in the lifetime? There are cases upon cases of “bargains” these people feel like they’ve “won”. I find myself sitting there and wondering if they would ever need this much of shampoo or bird seed even if the apocalypse was next week? It’s doubtful. Hmmm.

Let’s say some dire emergency is coming, which the forecast is calling for Wednesday night into Thursday morning (almost 12 inches)--what would we truly need to hoard to survive?

My family and I own a home out in the country. We do know how to survive off the land and we spend our weekends and summers living this way and modeling it for our children. How to survive on your own, in the wilderness, with just you and a few tools your parents taught you how to use. That’s how we roll.

SO that part of survival is about skill, and we’re set in that area. But what would we need, aside from certain skills, to survive in a case of emergency.  We can boil it down to FOUR simple things: water, fuel, batteries, and flashlights. No, shampoo did not make the list.

Water

The most basic of the basics, clean water becomes more precious than gold when it’s unavailable. And it’s so much more than just drinking it. You’ll need stored water for not only drinking, but cooking, sanitation, bathing, and, at some point, laundry.

Store plain tap water in cleaned out 2-liter soda bottles and stock up on cases of bottled water. If space allows, larger water containers can be stored outdoors.

You also want at least two ways to purify water. Unscented bleach is a good option: it takes just eight drops of bleach to purify a gallon of water, 16 drops if the water is cloudy. But be forewarned: bleach has a shelf life of just one year, and begins to lose potency after just a few months. Buy a new bottle every six months and begin using the old one for laundry and cleaning purposes.

Another easy way to purify water is to boil it, but this requires a fuel source. Plan ahead if you choose this option. A third easy alternative is the SteriPen, which uses UV light to purify water, a system that has long been used in hospitals.

Fuel

After Hurricane Sandy, you know how first-hand how precious fuel is during an emergency. Trying to get your hands on it was like trying to get your hands on the Holy Grail. We were lucky enough to have generators, but fuel was getting scarce and everyone was trying to get their hands on some. To prevent that from happening again, be prepared.

According to the American Petroleum Institute, gasoline can be safely housed in approved containers of less than five gallons each and rotated through every few months. Make sure to rotate the stock, by putting the oldest gas into the car, and refilling the gas can at the service station, adding fuel stabilizer each time.  If you only need to have 12 gallons on hand, get three 5 gallon cans (15 gallons total), and once a month put one into your car, and then refill it, putting it at the back of the row. Next month, put the next one in, etc.   If you "rob" your supply to fill the lawn mower, that's fine, too, just make sure you keep minimums on hand.

Gasoline should be stored in capacities of 25 gallons or less, should be stored at room temperature. Make sure it is away from sources of heat and ignition. Also make sure to store the gasoline in a building separate from the house or place of occupancy. Diesel fuel is an even safer option when it comes to storage. If you have a propane-powered grill, good news: Propane is one of the easiest and safest fuels to store. A supply of seasoned wood is also a necessity if your emergency plans include the use of a fireplace, wood-burning stove or cooking over a campfire.

Light Sources

Light sources come in all kinds of shape and sizes. You have flashlights, lanterns, candles, glow sticks etc., we tend to have them all on hand in strategic places. I have flashlights next to all the beds. We also have a light kit stored in the kitchen, a central location that is high enough and away from the kids, but easy enough for us to just grab on a moment’s notice. Make sure all flashlights have working batteries and that there are back up batteries in your kit. So hoard light sources AND batteries.

Canned Food

The kind of foods our parents hoarded back in the day is quite different from the foods we’d hoard today. We’ve come a long way in many ways, we are much more nutritionally conscious, but then again, we have many more chemicals and toxins that they didn’t have. It gets tricky figuring this out. There’s a great blog that lists what you’d need assuming we’re all First Time Shopping for Emergency Foods. Click here and read the list and all about what foods you want to hoard (or just stock up on) and why.

 

The forecast is calling for 12 inches Wednesday night. That means many of us will be snowed in with our kids and pets as well. Don’t forget to pack an emergency FUN kit to keep the kids busy, and to stock up on extra pet supplies. Also if someone in your family takes medications, make sure you have them as the likeliness you will be out of the house on Thursday is slim to none. Be safe, and be smart. Remember top prepare and protect, we must act proactively! Be safe friends and feel free to call me, Nelson, with any questions at 908.233.6300!

If you’ve ever watched Extreme Couponing on TLC, it takes less than 2 minutes to realize that most of these people have hoarding issues. How many bottles of Suave shampoo does one family need in the lifetime? There are cases upon cases of “bargains” these people feel like they’ve “won”. I find myself sitting there and wondering if they would ever need this much of shampoo or bird seed even if the apocalypse was next week? It’s doubtful. Hmmm.

Let’s say some dire emergency is coming, which the forecast is calling for Wednesday night into Thursday morning (almost 12 inches)--what would we truly need to hoard to survive?

My family and I own a home out in the country. We do know how to survive off the land and we spend our weekends and summers living this way and modeling it for our children. How to survive on your own, in the wilderness, with just you and a few tools your parents taught you how to use. That’s how we roll.

SO that part of survival is about skill, and we’re set in that area. But what would we need, aside from certain skills, to survive in a case of emergency.  We can boil it down to FOUR simple things: water, fuel, batteries, and flashlights. No, shampoo did not make the list.

Water

The most basic of the basics, clean water becomes more precious than gold when it’s unavailable. And it’s so much more than just drinking it. You’ll need stored water for not only drinking, but cooking, sanitation, bathing, and, at some point, laundry.

Store plain tap water in cleaned out 2-liter soda bottles and stock up on cases of bottled water. If space allows, larger water containers can be stored outdoors.

You also want at least two ways to purify water. Unscented bleach is a good option: it takes just eight drops of bleach to purify a gallon of water, 16 drops if the water is cloudy. But be forewarned: bleach has a shelf life of just one year, and begins to lose potency after just a few months. Buy a new bottle every six months and begin using the old one for laundry and cleaning purposes.

Another easy way to purify water is to boil it, but this requires a fuel source. Plan ahead if you choose this option. A third easy alternative is the SteriPen, which uses UV light to purify water, a system that has long been used in hospitals.

Fuel

After Hurricane Sandy, you know how first-hand how precious fuel is during an emergency. Trying to get your hands on it was like trying to get your hands on the Holy Grail. We were lucky enough to have generators, but fuel was getting scarce and everyone was trying to get their hands on some. To prevent that from happening again, be prepared.

According to the American Petroleum Institute, gasoline can be safely housed in approved containers of less than five gallons each and rotated through every few months. Make sure to rotate the stock, by putting the oldest gas into the car, and refilling the gas can at the service station, adding fuel stabilizer each time.  If you only need to have 12 gallons on hand, get three 5 gallon cans (15 gallons total), and once a month put one into your car, and then refill it, putting it at the back of the row. Next month, put the next one in, etc.   If you "rob" your supply to fill the lawn mower, that's fine, too, just make sure you keep minimums on hand.

Gasoline should be stored in capacities of 25 gallons or less, should be stored at room temperature. Make sure it is away from sources of heat and ignition. Also make sure to store the gasoline in a building separate from the house or place of occupancy. Diesel fuel is an even safer option when it comes to storage. If you have a propane-powered grill, good news: Propane is one of the easiest and safest fuels to store. A supply of seasoned wood is also a necessity if your emergency plans include the use of a fireplace, wood-burning stove or cooking over a campfire.

Light Sources

Light sources come in all kinds of shape and sizes. You have flashlights, lanterns, candles, glow sticks etc., we tend to have them all on hand in strategic places. I have flashlights next to all the beds. We also have a light kit stored in the kitchen, a central location that is high enough and away from the kids, but easy enough for us to just grab on a moment’s notice. Make sure all flashlights have working batteries and that there are back up batteries in your kit. So hoard light sources AND batteries.

Canned Food

The kind of foods our parents hoarded back in the day is quite different from the foods we’d hoard today. We’ve come a long way in many ways, we are much more nutritionally conscious, but then again, we have many more chemicals and toxins that they didn’t have. It gets tricky figuring this out. There’s a great blog that lists what you’d need assuming we’re all First Time Shopping for Emergency Foods. Click here and read the list and all about what foods you want to hoard (or just stock up on) and why.

The forecast is calling for 12 inches Wednesday night. That means many of us will be snowed in with our kids and pets as well. Don’t forget to pack an emergency FUN kit to keep the kids busy, and to stock up on extra pet supplies. Also if someone in your family takes medications, make sure you have them as the likeliness you will be out of the house on Thursday is slim to none. Be safe, and be smart. Remember top prepare and protect, we must act proactively! Be safe friends and feel free to call me, Nelson, with any questions at 908.233.6300!

Our family has partnered with Allstate for over 80 years to help people with their auto, home, life and business insurance needs. Our quality, service-oriented agency is not only owned and operated by a family, our customers tell us we make them feel like family too. I’m proud to work with a company who’s been serving satisfied customers for over 70 years. Customers count on outstanding financial strength and superior claims service to help protect what they value most. Allstate delivers on their promise. In fact, their outstanding financial strength and superior claims service received an A+ (Superior) rating by A.M. Best. Quality service, strength and satisfaction – that’s something I’m glad to be a part of. - Nelson Espeland III

The opinions expressed herein are the writer's alone, and do not reflect the opinions of TheAlternativePress.com or anyone who works for TheAlternativePress.com. TheAlternativePress.com is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the writer.

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